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The Region

The Mornington Peninsula Wine Region

Mornington Peninsula is a special place where vines thrive in sheltered undulating valleys nurtured by a maritime cool climate creating elegant, personality-packed award-winning wines - predominantly Pinot Noir and Chardonnay with Pinot Grigio and Shiraz a smaller presence.

Mornington Peninsula's signature wine? It is supple & alluring, coaxing elegant and delicate varietal characters from the locally grown Pinot Noir. Appropriately, the region's wines show great finesse but don't be fooled by any apparent delicacy, as these wines are packed full of intensity, structure & texture.

Mornington Peninsula Wines and Statistics

Walk pristine beaches and spectacular cliff tops, catch a wave, paddle a sea kayak, tackle the fairway at Cape Schanck, or sip a seductive Pinot Noir and feel the difference when you visit the Mornington Peninsula.

Less than an hour's drive south-east of Melbourne, the region now hosts 200 small-scale vineyards and more than 50 cellar doors offering visitors a personal warm welcome and taste of the region's diverse and impressive collection of fine wines. Mornington Peninsula wineries are supported by exceptional, and an increasing variety, of restaurants, bistros and cafes.

Maps of Mornington Peninsula Soils and Contours of the region

Why Mornington Peninsula Chardonnay and Pinot Noir?

Click here for the answer by Richard McIntyre, Moorooduc Estate

Biosecurity in the Mornington Peninsula focusses on Phylloxera protocls and strongly encourages those in the industry to be aware of and to implement the following protocols. Fopr those visiting the region please also be aware of the threat by Phylloxera...

For those in the industry, please follow these links and print these important documents for your reference and distribution to others during harvest and throughout the year.

The Mornington Peninsula is a PRZ (Phylloxera Risk Zone) as we are not defined to be with or without phylloxera.

 

Therefore every effort should be made to ensure your property and region remains free of Phylloxera.

Biosecurity tips during harvest

Important Phylloxera Protocols to be aware of and spread the word

If dealing with other regions be aware of their zoning, as in this Phylloxera Zones Map

Print this Phylloxera Poster or pick up this and any other copies of these documents from the MPVA office

MPVA Membership Details are included in the following link:

Mornington Peninsula wine region background and Mornington Peninsula Vignerons Membership

Vintage Reports

2015 Vintage
2014 Vintage
2013 Vintage
2012 - 2005
2004 - 2001

Vintage 2009

The Mornington Peninsula wine region has fared better than many other regions throughout Australia, however recent weather has had a severe impact. Following a cool December last year, some vineyards were affected when flowering and fruit set was diminished, which resulted in predicted lower yields, particularly in the cooler areas of the Peninsula. By the middle of January all vineyards were growing extremely well with good vigor and vine health

Following three days of extreme heat in the mid 40s in early February, many grapes were sunburned which resulted in some shrivel in vineyards where rows which face west, or run north/south, were particularly exposed to the scorching sun. The vineyard aspect, elevation and management practices are always tested in such extreme conditions, and the timing of any irrigation, leaf plucking and bunch exposure will have resulted in specific outcomes in each vineyard. 
A small number of growers have harvested small parcels of fruit in late February but in general harvest appears to be generally consistent with previous later ripening years. Smoke taint is not an issue at all, with no fires and negligible smoke present in the region following the terrible Victorian bushfires in other regions.

However, the overall effect of the above on Mornington Peninsula yields was expected to be an average loss of between 5 - 30% of 'normal' yields. The MPVA is mindful of calling anything normal in any agribusiness, as by the nature of the business, the yearly impacts will always be a result of the preceding year as well as the prevailing climatic conditions through the current season, quite apart from the individual aspect, orientation and management practices. Winemakers' feedback so far shows fruit with high natural acidity and good flavours.

As harvest continued into early to mid April reports have been much more positive than an initial gloomy outlook. Surprising, following the extreme heat incidents in late January/February, the cool climate autumn returned and the vintage ended similarly to one of our later ripening seasons. Winemakers are very pleased with the quality of grapes picked and regrettably the quantity will be reduced in most varieties although typically some varieties fared better with these odd occurrences than others. We look forward to another fantastic vintage in 2009 which shows the viticultural integrity of the region yet again.

Vintage 2008

The growing season followed a very dry winter and started with an early bud burst. A cool spring with some hail and frost in pockets within the region in October and November resulted in some poor fruit set which ultimately resulted in reduced yield in some parts of the region. The soil type and water availability at specific sites dictated the fruit weights and ultimate yields. Some rain in January and February helped vines to present in good condition for harvest. Harvest occurred perhaps earlier than 2006 in higher areas but generally harvest was around the same timeframe as 2006. Low yields were due mainly to low berry weights, in some cases 50g instead of 80g bunches were experienced. About 75% of average yield has been experienced due to the unusual growing conditions but particularly the one in one hundred year drought. Although almost all growers reported reduced crops, variations due to varieties and the actual yield have been seen throughout the region. Fruit quality has been good with the smaller berries leading to some quite intense fruit flavours.

Vintage 2007

The growing season followed a very dry winter and started with an early bud burst. A cool spring with some hail and frost in pockets within the region in October and November resulted in some poor fruit set which ultimately resulted in reduced yield in some parts of the region. The soil type and water availability at specific sites dictated the fruit weights and ultimate yields. Some rain in January and February helped vines to present in good condition for harvest. Harvest occurred perhaps earlier than 2006 in higher areas but generally harvest was around the same timeframe as 2006. Low yields were due mainly to low berry weights, in some cases 50g instead of 80g bunches were experienced. About 75% of average yield has been experienced due to the unusual growing conditions but particularly the one in one hundred year drought. Although almost all growers reported reduced crops, variations due to varieties and the actual yield have been seen throughout the region. Fruit quality has been good with the smaller berries leading to some quite intense fruit flavours.

Vintage 2006

A very warm start to the season lead to early budburst and flowering. Good rains during spring continued during the start of summer. Post Christmas temperatures cooled down significantly which slowed the ripening rate although in general harvest was 2 weeks early. Disease pressure had been a concern due to early humidity it did not eventuate as a significant problem. The quality in both red and white grapes is extremely good - for the fourth year in a row. Yields were less than average in red and average in white varieties.

Vintage 2005

A very wet end to winter and a wet start to spring saw some vineyards showing signs of stress from wet roots early in the growing period. There were also some signs of salt damage with the wet weather bringing up salt that had accumulated through the preceding dry years. The season moved on to be cool and dry. Flowering and fruit set was good and vine growth healthy. Very little disease pressure was encountered this season. A late cool vintage was expected but autumn turned out to be dry and very warm and grape maturities accelerated to see harvest getting underway about a week later than normal and then rushing quickly through with real pressure on to get the grapes picked at optimum maturity.  Analysis of the grape juice showed good balance with slightly higher than usual levels of acid. 2005 could be seen as one of the best ever on the Mornington Peninsula.

Vintage 2004 and beyond